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Seeking Jess Vegan Nutrition Vegan Recipes Vegan Tips

Recipe: Quick Tofu & Broccoli (VEGAN)

This Quick Vegan Tofu & Broccoli Recipe is what you have been missing your whole life. Trust me 🙂

Honestly, I don’t think I have ever cooked something so quick with so little effort. And it just tasted bomb. Like seriously. I didn’t want the meal to end.

Portions: 2-3

This meal has 9.1g of protein and 60g of carbs. It’s also high in iron, calcium, vitamin A, vitamin C and folate.

Quick Vegan Tofu & Broccoli Recipe:

What you’ll need:

  • 1 cup of bulgur
  • 2 tsp oil (preferably sunflower)
  • 3 gloves of garlic
  • 1/2 red onion
  • 2 cups tofu
  • 3 cups broccoli
  • 1/2 cup soy sauce
  • vegetable broth
  • 2 tsp mustard
  • salt & pepper for taste
  • siracha for taste

Preparation:

  • cook up 1 cup of bulgur with 2 cups of water and add 1 tbs of vegetable broth
  • heat up some oil in a pot, add the garlic and onion and let cook for 2-3 minutes
  • mix up 1/2 cup of vegetable broth mixed with water, soy sauce and mustard
  • add tofu and broccoli to the pan and pour over with mixture
  • let cook for about 10-15 minutes on medium heat
  • add salt and pepper for taste
  • serve and add siracha for taste

If you would like to see the whole macro- & micronutrient count, make sure to check out cronometer.com.

Enjoy 🙂 

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Seeking Jess Vegan Nutrition Vegan Tips

The Vegan Diet: Best Nutrition Guide & Critical Nutrients

The Vegan Diet: Best Nutrition Guide & Critical Nutrients

Recently I have released two podcast episodes covering exactly this topic. As there is a lot of information covered in both episodes (#5 & #6), I decided that I am going to give you a small summary and share a few tips with you, so you can make sure you are getting all of the essential nutrients in your diet.

In case you would like to listen to the podcast episodes first, you can do so here (also available on iTunes, Spotify and Stitcher):

Generally, I always advocate for a whole food plant based diet, as I believe it to be the healthiest. A whole food plant based diet is made up of 5 main food groups which are: whole grains, legumes, vegetables, fruits and nuts & seeds.

I personally follow the 80-20 rule. This means that 80% of the time I eat a whole food plant based diet and the other 20% I like to indulge in vegan junk food like ice cream, pizza, burgers, etc.

If you are currently transitioning into veganism or you are already vegan, it is important to make regular blood checks. If it you are low on some nutrient, it is advised to work closely with your doctor or nutritionist. And in addition to that, work on an adequate meal plan and/or supplementation.

And now let’s have a look at the Nutrition Guide for a Vegan Diet and the list of nutrients that might be critical on a vegan/plant based diet and what to do:

Omega 3

Omega 3 on a vegan diet

Iron

iron on a vegan diet

Vitamin D

vitamin d on a vegan diet

Iodine

iodine on a vegan diet

B12

Calcium

B2

Selenium

I hope this information could help you in some kind of way. You can always reach out to me at any time if you need more help or advice. I love connecting with every single one of you.

With love,

Jess x

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Seeking Jess Vegan Nutrition Vegan Tips

10 Ways To Consume Less Sugar

Everyone loves the taste of something sweet, which in most cases is caused by added sugar.

First of all, let’s answer the question: What is sugar?

Sugar is a carbohydrate. Glucose is the most common carbohydrate and the most important and quickest source of energy.

Refined sugar in processed foods is the bad one as it has no vital substances or fiber. It has literally no use for the functions of our body. Overconsumption of sugar can be linked to several diseases such as obesity and type 2 diabetes.

I personally try to limit my consumption of sugar as much as I can, but I do like to indulge in sweets once in a while.

A few other things that have helped me reduce my sugar consumption are:

  1. Substitute sugar with dried fruit like dates, dried figs and raisins
  2. Spice things up with cinnamon, nutmeg, etc.
  3. Substitute overripe bananas (e.g. add to oatmeal or as sweetener in many recipes)
  4. Try to not consume anything sweet for 2 weeks, your taste buds will adapt very quickly and you will crave it less
  5. Use dark chocolate or cocoa powder
  6. Drink herbal teas with a lot of flavour (especially fruit)
  7. Make healthy vegan desserts out of raw ingredients
  8. Try to eat more nuts (fat content can reduce sugar craving)
  9. Try to eat more fruit and don’t be scared of the sugar in it (check blogpost)
  10. Swap out the soda for flavoured water (cold water with orange, lemon, cucumber, strawberry slices)

Lastly, I would say that you should always make sure to check food labels, as there is sugar in almost anything! Check out this blogpost for the different names sugar can have.

With love,

Jess x

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Seeking Jess Vegan Facts Vegan Nutrition

Is Veganism The Secret To Longevity?

When it comes to the term “healthy diet”, I feel like every single person is having their own opinion about that. That’s why it is difficult to generalise this term and say that a specific diet, such as for example the vegan diet, is the healthiest.

If you have been vegan for a while now, like me, you also know that you can eat only junk food and still be vegan. So, is a vegan diet still the healthiest? I don’t think so.

I personally believe that it is up to everyone to understand what is healthiest for them and make sure that we have an understanding about how our body works.

I personally find it super interesting to have a look at how our diet has evolved. When we do so, we can see that our diet has changed a lot. If we go a little further, we can also see that diets differs from region to region.

There is one specific region that has caught not only my attention, but also the attention of many others. Why? Because these people are known to have lived a long life, some of them becoming 100 years or older.

What place am I speaking about?

It is Okinawa.

Okinawa is located in the south of Japan.

The most interesting part is that we might be able to see a link between nutrition and why these people have lived there for so long. There are 50 people to 100,000 people in Okinawa that are 100 years or older. When compared to Germany it is only 17 to 100,000 people. In year 2000 women could live up to 86 years and men to 78 years.

When we look at the typical western diseases such as breast cancer, prostate cancer or coronary heart diseases, the numbers are very low. These people are also known to work out a lot and be very active. Of course, one argument could be that these people are just very lucky to have good genes. But another thing we could do is to have a look at their diet.

So how does the diet of the people in Okinawa look like?

  1. It is mostly plant-based. A big part of their diet is made out of sweet potatoes.
  2. They eat only until they are 80% full, which means that they don’t overeat.
  3. They see food as a medicine. They are conscious about what type of food they put into their bodies.
  4. Their sugar and fat intake is very low.
  5. Their protein intake is very low. Most of the protein comes from soy products, such as tofu or miso soups.
  6. They eat a lot of vitamin C, vitamin E, folate and vitamin B6.
  7. They get vitamin D through sunlight exposure.
  8. Their drinking water is very rich in calcium.
  9. They consume a lot of potassium, while their sodium intake is low.
  10. Their consumption of saturated fat is very low.
  11. They consume a lot of complex carbohydrates (low glycemic index).
  12. They consume a lot of herbs & spices.
  13. Meat is consumed only once a month.
  14. Alcohol consumption is very limited.
  15. Fish consumption is eaten but not regularly.

So generally we can say that the food that the people of Okinawa eat is very low in energy but very high in their nutritional value. Vegetables have very low calories, of which you can eat a lot of while getting in a lot of amazing nutrients. And because of their calorie restriction they live by, the older generation is not overweight and lives longer.

Unfortunately these are all facts that have been measured before the 1960s. Now, a lot of things have changed not only in Japan but in the world in general. People are now starting to gain weight in Okinawa and people do not live as long anymore. They do not move that much and they now consume a lot of meat, fish, white rice and bread.

As mentioned before, their longevity might have been due to their genes. But when we take a closer look on how the diet has shifted and what is currently happening over there, we might be able to see a correlation between diet and longevity.

Now it is up to you to decide what you want to believe.

With love,

Jess x

Categories
Vegan Nutrition Vegan Tips

Is Sugar In Fruit Bad For Us?

Is sugar in fruit bad for us?

I hear so many people saying that the sugar in fruit can make you gain weight.

For that matter it is important to mention that sugar does not always equal sugar and that there are different types of it.

Generally, a high consumption of sugar is associated with several diseases. Most of us know that sugary candy bars and chocolate are not part of a healthy diet.

It is important to know that sugars belong to carbohydrates and the carbohydrate glucose is the most important and quickest source of energy.

But which sugar are we talking about? As you probably already know, the refined sugar in processed foods is the bad one as it has no vital substances or fiber. It has literally no use for the functions of our body.

So the sugar that can be used as a source of energy are the complex carbohydrates. The less processed the food, the better. These kind of foods are whole grains, potatoes, legumes and vegetables. You do not have to worry about the sugar in these kind of foods. 

The sugar that you have to worry about is the hidden sugar in processed foods, which are added in order to make the products taste better.

Some examples of foods with hidden sugar are: soft drinks, baked goods, sandwich spreads, some plant milks, ketchup, salad dressings, foods in cans, cereal or cereal bars, ready-made meals, sauces, plant based yogurts, fruit juice, nut butters, dried fruit, coffee drinks, bottled tea, protein powder, tomato sauce, energy bars, instant oatmeal, packaged fruits, etc.

One thing we also have to remember is that sugar has many different names on labels. Make sure to have a lookout at these names:

  • words ending with “ose”: fructose, sucrose, maltose, dextrose, glucose, lactose, galactose
  • everything with syrup: high fructos corn syrup (HFCS), agave syrup, maple syrup, brown rice syrup, corn syrup, malt syrup, rice syrup,
  • everything with “sugar”
  • fruit juice
  • apple sweetener,
  • dextrin,
  • fruit extract,
  • fruit puree,
  • fruit powder,
  • concentrated fruit juice
  • barley malt
  • wheat dextrin
  • honey
So now back to the main question if sugar in fruit is bad for us

Studies show that the sugar in fruit does not have the same negative effects on our body as the refined sugars.

Fruit is rich in secondary phytonutrients, fiber, micronutrients, it has anti- inflammatory effects, it improves artery function and it has the possibility to reduce the risk of cancer. Due to the high water content in fruit, sugar is not as concentrated and therefore make fruit a very healthy food.

The World Health Organization suggest a consumption of minimum 400 grams of fruit and vegetables per day.

To summarise, we can say that we should not be scared of the sugar in fruit. I personally eat fruit in abundance as it makes me feel great. And I as I have a sweet tooth, fruits are the best type of treat for me.

What is your favourite fruit?

With love,

Jess x

Categories
Vegan Nutrition Vegan Tips

Top 3 Mistakes I Did When I Became Vegan (and you shouldn’t do)

These are the top 3 mistakes I did when I became vegan more than a year ago.

It was honestly the best decision I have ever made. I watched multiple documentaries on the health benefits and the aspect of animal agriculture. I knew there was no way of going back anymore. It was the best decision that was not only going to impact my health positively, but also have positive impacts on the environment. And most importantly I could help safe many animals and hopefully inspire others to do the same.

But coming back from a background with a disordered view on food (and health), I didn’t have a real plan on how to best approach a vegan diet. I have done some mistakes during my transition, from which I have learned from. I would like to share these mistakes with you, in case you are at the start of transitioning into veganism or you are considering it, which is already awesome!

 

#1 I believed everything I heard, read and saw

I became vegan, because of the internet. It showed me things I didn’t know about and it taught me a lot about myself as well, this I am grateful for.

At the same time, unfortunately, there is also a lot of misinformation out there and literally everyone can put up videos, which might show content showing and saying things that are not necessarily always correct.

One thing that has really given me a false image of veganism was people showing a very restricted diet, such as the fruitarian diet. Maybe for some people this will work, but for the average transitioning vegan, this is a very big shift, and can come with a lot of confusion as well as health issues, when not applied correctly.

And so this was me, I believed everything I saw, which confused me a lot.

 

#2 I overate. On everything

I believed everything influencers said. Such as: “eat as much as you want and loose weight”.

And because of this type of misinformation, I started consuming a lot more calories than my body actually needed, which also lead to a lot of digestive issues. Again, for people like me, coming from a distorted body image and an unhealthy mindset about food, these kind of statements can get very confusing.

At that time I was living in Barcelona, where vegan junk food is available every where. And here we are, I was over-excited and I started trying it all, from vegan burgers, to pizzas, to ice-creams and cakes. I forgot that these foods are full of sugars and added oils, something, I was avoiding before at any cost, as I was always very health cautious.

Don’t get me wrong, it is okay to consume these foods once in a while. But not to such an extent where you feel low on energy, you have digestive issues and you gain weight. And that was me. Even though I was working out every single day, I was gaining weight and I didn’t understand why.

As an upcoming vegan nutritionist, my main focus is on health, physically as well as mentally. As these 2 go hand in hand. It is also important to understand how we can fuel our body in order to feel like our best selfs. This includes indulging on convenient foods once in a while. As in the long run these foods will not make you feel good.

Also, I believe that mock meats and convenient foods are great for those of you who are currently transitioning into a vegan diet, as this will help you ease the process.

 

#3 I didn’t do enough research

There is never enough research you can do. And I think that this point ties in with my previous two points.

Before I went vegan I always considered my diet as healthy. You know, the lean chicken and eggs for protein kinda diet. Well, so by cutting out those animal foods, I was left with “almost nothing” and a little confused as what to eat. I always thought carbs are the enemy, as they can make you “gain weight”. So my diet consisted of almost no carbs at all (excluding fruit). And all of a sudden I am vegan, where there is carbs in everything.

So obviously I didn’t know enough research as to what I can substitute these foods with. I also didn’t know that carbs, the complex ones such as grains, beans, etc. do NOT make you fat. Grains should be a staple of your diet.

So I am sharing these things I did with you, as I would like your transitioning to be easier. With time I learned how tasteful, healthy and good vegan/plant based food is. Also, it is funny how I used to hate cooking. Since I am vegan though, I really enjoy it, as you can be really creative in the kitchen.

As a conclusion, it is important to find what is best for oneself, as every body is different and everyone reacts differently to each food. Therefore I can only suggest changing it up once in a while and seeing what works best.

In case of any questions or advice, you can always reach out to me.

With love,

Jess x