Categories
Seeking Jess Vegan Nutrition Vegan Recipes Vegan Tips

Recipe: Quick Tofu & Broccoli (VEGAN)

This Quick Vegan Tofu & Broccoli Recipe is what you have been missing your whole life. Trust me 🙂

Honestly, I don’t think I have ever cooked something so quick with so little effort. And it just tasted bomb. Like seriously. I didn’t want the meal to end.

Portions: 2-3

This meal has 9.1g of protein and 60g of carbs. It’s also high in iron, calcium, vitamin A, vitamin C and folate.

Quick Vegan Tofu & Broccoli Recipe:

What you’ll need:

  • 1 cup of bulgur
  • 2 tsp oil (preferably sunflower)
  • 3 gloves of garlic
  • 1/2 red onion
  • 2 cups tofu
  • 3 cups broccoli
  • 1/2 cup soy sauce
  • vegetable broth
  • 2 tsp mustard
  • salt & pepper for taste
  • siracha for taste

Preparation:

  • cook up 1 cup of bulgur with 2 cups of water and add 1 tbs of vegetable broth
  • heat up some oil in a pot, add the garlic and onion and let cook for 2-3 minutes
  • mix up 1/2 cup of vegetable broth mixed with water, soy sauce and mustard
  • add tofu and broccoli to the pan and pour over with mixture
  • let cook for about 10-15 minutes on medium heat
  • add salt and pepper for taste
  • serve and add siracha for taste

If you would like to see the whole macro- & micronutrient count, make sure to check out cronometer.com.

Enjoy 🙂 

Categories
Seeking Jess Vegan Nutrition Vegan Tips

Vegan Recipe: Chickpea & Lentil Salad

Vegan Recipe: Chickpea & Lentil Salad

Are you looking for a quick, nutritious vegan meal that is high in protein? Then you are right here. I prepared this salad for a vegan dinner party and it literally look me 10 minutes to make!

And the best part of it? You are having legumes, which are one of the healthiest foods out there!

Why are legumes great?

As mentioned above, legumes are a great source of vegan protein

They are also:

  • high in fiber
  • complex carbohydrates, which means they will keep you fuller for longer, providing you with energy
  • high in B-vitamins
  • high in iron, calcium, phosphorous, zinc and magnesium
  • good source of folate
  • low in saturated fat and have no cholesterol

These are the macronutrients you will get through this meal:

  • Protein: 67.2g
  • Net Carbs: 136.2g
  • Fat: 28.5g

Total Calories: ~ 1255 kcal

If you would like to get a better into depth info about the macro- & micronutrients of this vegan chickpea & lentil salad, make sure to check out cronometer.com

Recipe: Vegan Chickpea & Lentil Salad

Portions: 2

What you will need:

  • 2 handful of parsley
  • 2 cups lentils
  • 1/3 cup cucumber
  • 2 cups chickpeas
  • 1/3 red onion
  • 2 tbsps mustard
  • 1 tbsp hummus
  • salt to taste
  • 1/3 cup tomatoes
  • 1 full red bell pepper
  • 1/3 cup green bell pepper
  • juice from 1/2 half lemon 
  • 1 tbsp olive oil (optional)

Preparation:

  • cook lentils and chickpeas or rinse cooked ones with water
  • cut up vegetables and place everything in a bowl with the chickpeas and lentils
  • add hummus, mustard, olive oil, lemon and salt & pepper to taste

And lastly, serve and enjoy!

With love,

Jess x

Categories
Seeking Jess Vegan Nutrition Vegan Tips

How To Make The Perfect Buddha Bowl

How To Make The Perfect Buddha Bowl

If you are new into a plant based diet or you just really like nurturing yourself with the best whole foods, this post is perfect for you.

I am literally obsessed with buddha bowls! A buddha bowl is usually vegan/vegetarian and it is a combination of many different food items put together and served cold. Sounds like the perfect lunch or dinner during a hot summer, right?

So now the big question:

How To Make The Perfect Buddha Bowl?

1. Add your base

A perfect base are complex carbohydrates or whole grains. These are one of the healthiest foods and should be a staple in a whole food plant based diet. Whole grains are packed with fiber, proteins, B vitamins, antioxidants and minerals.

Great whole grains as a base are:

  • Amaranth
  • Brown (or white) rice
  • Quinoa
  • Millet
  • Buckwheat

2. Add your green base

Greens are full of vitamins and minerals, are high in water content and low in calories.

These are some greenst that are perfect for your buddha bowl:

  • Lettuce
  • Spinach (Iron, Calcium and Vitamin A)
  • Kale (Calcium, Vitamin K)
  • Rocket (Vitamin A, Vitamin K)
  • Bok Choy (Vitamin A, Vitamin C)

3. Add your protein

It is important to start with the fact that we don’t need as much protein as most of us believe. All we need is for the protein to make up 10% – 25% of our diet, which can be easily achieved by adding beans, legumes, whole grains, nuts and seeds into our diet.

Add these vegan proteins to your buddha bowl:

  • Tofu
  • Tempeh
  • Falafel
  • Beans
  • Hummus
  • Chickpeas
  • Lentils

4. Add your healthy fats

Whole healthy fats are so important to add to our diet regularly. If you follow a plant based/vegan diet, make sure to get a high amount of Omega 3 into your diet, which you can get through Chia, Hemp or Flax Seeds as well as Walnuts.

Add these healthy fats to your buddha bowl:

  • Avocado
  • Flax Seeds
  • Olives
  • Nuts
  • Hemp Seeds

5. Add your veggies

This is definitely my favourite part when putting together a buddha bowl. Add all of your favourite vegetables!

Some veggies I personally love to add are:

  • Cucumber
  • Peppers
  • Corn
  • Broccoli
  • Cauliflower
  • Tomatoes
  • Carrots
  • Beets

6. Add your dressing

And to perfectly round your buddha bowl up, you should not forget the perfect dressing. I personally like to keep it simple by adding a few of those:

  • Tahini
  • Lemon
  • Soy Sauce
  • Balsamic Vinegar
  • Vegan Mayo
  • Peanut Butter Sauce
  • Mustard
  • Apple Cider Vinegar

I really hope I could make this summer a little bit tastier for you by sharing this quick how to make a buddha bowl recipe.

With love,

Jess x

Categories
Seeking Jess Vegan Tips

5 Tips To Help You Transform into Veganism

5 Tips To Help You Transform Into Veganism

Lately I have been receiving a lot of messages from non-vegans that they are scared to even try to being vegan as it seems so complicated and they have no idea how to start and what to do.

I completely understand you. It might seem a little overwhelming at first. But trust me, it is easier than you think. I have been there too and so have most vegans. Just a couple of years ago I would always say that I could never be vegan, as I couldn’t imagine living without meat or dairy.

Well, I guess you know the rest of the story.

Becoming vegan has been one of the best decisions I have ever made. That’s why I would like to share these 5 tips with you that could most likely help you in your transition. Also, you can always reach out to me for questions or support. I am more than happy to help.

#1 Check out your local supermarkets for vegan options

One thing I always enjoying doing when I am travelling is to check the local supermarkets for vegan options. I was honestly surprised when I found so many different vegan options in a mini-shop in a very small town in Poland. That’s why I love telling other people to just take some time and do the same. I am sure you will be surprised! You might find some great milk alternatives or vegan meat substitutes!

#2 Don’t overcomplicate it. Start by substituting one thing at a time.

One thing I hear a lot is that people don’t know where and how to start being vegan. But the secret is to not overcomplicate it. Have a look at what you usually eat and change it up. So for example, if you used to put cheese and ham on your sandwich, start using vegan cheese and vegan dip, hummus or avocado. It is as simple as that! If you used to love burgers, choose the vegan patty instead. We live in 2019 now where brands like Beyond Meat have created patties that taste just like meat. There are literally no more excuses!

#3 Connect with other vegans and ask for tips

Most vegans on the Internet are happy to connect with others and share their own experience in their transition into Veganism. Now, when it is so easy to slide into other people’s DMs, do it! Don’t be scared. You might even make some friends!

#4 Don’t be scared to try new things

When I hear people telling me that they have never tried vegan food, I highly doubt it. Most of us have had fries with ketchup, chips or bananas, right? Also, a lot of people can not even imagine living without cheese or meat. But you know what I think is really cool? Our taste buds can adapt super quickly. The life cycle of our taste buds is somewhere between 10 days to two weeks. If you are not used to eating a lot of vegetables or fruit and you start incorporating those into your diet, they might not taste great in the beginning. But with time, due to our taste buds adapting, these foods can start being really tasty.

Also go check out if there are some vegan places near you and google some cool vegan recipes. There is an overflow of delicious vegan recipes online!

#5 Don’t try to be perfect. Every small change and action counts!

I like to say that perfection is the enemy of progress. When I first became vegan and made a mistake by accident (ate something non-vegan) I felt super bad and like I failed all the way. But with time I also started realising that it is part of the journey, as I am only human and it is completely okay to not be perfect. What counts is the thought, the small change and the actions you do every day. Even if it is only something small, you are still doing more than most people.

I really hope that these tips will help you in one way or the other.

With love,

Jess x

Categories
Seeking Jess Vegan Nutrition Vegan Tips

10 Ways To Consume Less Sugar

Everyone loves the taste of something sweet, which in most cases is caused by added sugar.

First of all, let’s answer the question: What is sugar?

Sugar is a carbohydrate. Glucose is the most common carbohydrate and the most important and quickest source of energy.

Refined sugar in processed foods is the bad one as it has no vital substances or fiber. It has literally no use for the functions of our body. Overconsumption of sugar can be linked to several diseases such as obesity and type 2 diabetes.

I personally try to limit my consumption of sugar as much as I can, but I do like to indulge in sweets once in a while.

A few other things that have helped me reduce my sugar consumption are:

  1. Substitute sugar with dried fruit like dates, dried figs and raisins
  2. Spice things up with cinnamon, nutmeg, etc.
  3. Substitute overripe bananas (e.g. add to oatmeal or as sweetener in many recipes)
  4. Try to not consume anything sweet for 2 weeks, your taste buds will adapt very quickly and you will crave it less
  5. Use dark chocolate or cocoa powder
  6. Drink herbal teas with a lot of flavour (especially fruit)
  7. Make healthy vegan desserts out of raw ingredients
  8. Try to eat more nuts (fat content can reduce sugar craving)
  9. Try to eat more fruit and don’t be scared of the sugar in it (check blogpost)
  10. Swap out the soda for flavoured water (cold water with orange, lemon, cucumber, strawberry slices)

Lastly, I would say that you should always make sure to check food labels, as there is sugar in almost anything! Check out this blogpost for the different names sugar can have.

With love,

Jess x

Categories
Seeking Jess Vegan Facts Vegan Nutrition

Is Veganism The Secret To Longevity?

When it comes to the term “healthy diet”, I feel like every single person is having their own opinion about that. That’s why it is difficult to generalise this term and say that a specific diet, such as for example the vegan diet, is the healthiest.

If you have been vegan for a while now, like me, you also know that you can eat only junk food and still be vegan. So, is a vegan diet still the healthiest? I don’t think so.

I personally believe that it is up to everyone to understand what is healthiest for them and make sure that we have an understanding about how our body works.

I personally find it super interesting to have a look at how our diet has evolved. When we do so, we can see that our diet has changed a lot. If we go a little further, we can also see that diets differs from region to region.

There is one specific region that has caught not only my attention, but also the attention of many others. Why? Because these people are known to have lived a long life, some of them becoming 100 years or older.

What place am I speaking about?

It is Okinawa.

Okinawa is located in the south of Japan.

The most interesting part is that we might be able to see a link between nutrition and why these people have lived there for so long. There are 50 people to 100,000 people in Okinawa that are 100 years or older. When compared to Germany it is only 17 to 100,000 people. In year 2000 women could live up to 86 years and men to 78 years.

When we look at the typical western diseases such as breast cancer, prostate cancer or coronary heart diseases, the numbers are very low. These people are also known to work out a lot and be very active. Of course, one argument could be that these people are just very lucky to have good genes. But another thing we could do is to have a look at their diet.

So how does the diet of the people in Okinawa look like?

  1. It is mostly plant-based. A big part of their diet is made out of sweet potatoes.
  2. They eat only until they are 80% full, which means that they don’t overeat.
  3. They see food as a medicine. They are conscious about what type of food they put into their bodies.
  4. Their sugar and fat intake is very low.
  5. Their protein intake is very low. Most of the protein comes from soy products, such as tofu or miso soups.
  6. They eat a lot of vitamin C, vitamin E, folate and vitamin B6.
  7. They get vitamin D through sunlight exposure.
  8. Their drinking water is very rich in calcium.
  9. They consume a lot of potassium, while their sodium intake is low.
  10. Their consumption of saturated fat is very low.
  11. They consume a lot of complex carbohydrates (low glycemic index).
  12. They consume a lot of herbs & spices.
  13. Meat is consumed only once a month.
  14. Alcohol consumption is very limited.
  15. Fish consumption is eaten but not regularly.

So generally we can say that the food that the people of Okinawa eat is very low in energy but very high in their nutritional value. Vegetables have very low calories, of which you can eat a lot of while getting in a lot of amazing nutrients. And because of their calorie restriction they live by, the older generation is not overweight and lives longer.

Unfortunately these are all facts that have been measured before the 1960s. Now, a lot of things have changed not only in Japan but in the world in general. People are now starting to gain weight in Okinawa and people do not live as long anymore. They do not move that much and they now consume a lot of meat, fish, white rice and bread.

As mentioned before, their longevity might have been due to their genes. But when we take a closer look on how the diet has shifted and what is currently happening over there, we might be able to see a correlation between diet and longevity.

Now it is up to you to decide what you want to believe.

With love,

Jess x

Categories
Vegan Nutrition

Omega 3 On A Vegan Diet – What Do You Have To Know?

Omega 3 On Vegan Diet

There is a common misconception that it is difficult to get enough Omega 3 on a vegan diet. Most people believe that the number one source of Omega 3 is fish.

Let’s see why Omega 3 fatty acids are essential for our body, why the believe of fish being the only Omega 3 source is not true and how we can ensure an adequate Omega 3 consumption on a vegan diet.

 

Function

Omega 3 fatty acids are, as mentioned above, essential for our body, which means that our body can not synthesize this nutrient itself and it needs to be supplied from the outside.

Omega 3 has many functions in our organism:

  • important component of the human cell membrane
  • highly concentrated in the brain and nerve cells (especially DHA)
  • plays an important role in the development of retina and brain in the growth phase

There are two types of Omega 3 fatty acids, which are ALA (alpha-linolenic acid) and EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid) & DHA (docosahexaenoic acid).

EPA & DHA, which is mostly found in animal products, is the direct form of Omega 3, whereas ALA (mostly found in plant products) is the indirect from.

Our body can only make use of EPA & DHA. Therefore, when plant products are consumed, our body first needs to convert ALA into EPA & DHA.

 

Omega 3 fatty acids & Omega 6 fatty acids

Omega 3 fatty acids (EPA & DHA) have anti-inflammatory potential. It expands our blood vessels and thus can lower or balance blood pressure. It harmonizes the blood lipid image and has positive effects on the cardiovascular system and rheumatic diseases.

Omega 6 fatty acids, on the other hand, can promote inflammatory processes.

Omega 6 in animal products have arachidonic acid, plant products have linoleic acids, which have to be converted to arachidonic acid in the body.

Both conversions, ALA into EPA or DHA and linoleic acid into arachidonic acid use the same enzymes. That means that they are both “competing” for the same enzyme.

It matters how much of Omega 3 and Omega 6 is consumed, as even a small imbalance can have certain effects.

An optimal ratio of Omega 6 to Omega 3 would be 5:1 (the smaller the better)

Good plant sources of Omega 3 are:

  • flax seeds
  • hemp seeds
  • chia seeds
  • walnuts
  • and all of the related oils 

(Note: All these foods also have Omega 6, but with a good ratio to Omega 3)

High concentrations of Omega 6 can be found in sunflower seeds and oil, pumpkin seeds and oil, most nuts (almonds, brazil buts, peanuts and hazelnuts) and plant oils such as wheat germ, thistle, corn germ, sesame and soybean oil).

Micro algae and linseed oil can be good sources of Omega 3 as they have DHA and EPA (this is where fish get their O3 from).

As a summary, vegans should not be too worried about not getting enough Omega 3 fatty acids, when a whole food plant based diet is followed and the above mentioned foods are incorporated regularly into the diet. Important to remember is that omega-3 fatty acids should be balanced with the amount of omega-6 fatty acids consumed through diet to counteract inflammatory processes in the body.

 

With love,

Jess x

Categories
Vegan Facts Vegan Nutrition Vegan Tips

Cow’s Milk vs. Plant Milk (Nutrients, Environment, Animals)

Cow’s Milk vs. Plant Milk

What are the differences of cow’s milk vs. plant milk? As plant milk is starting to become more popular all over the world, the demand of cow’s milk is decreasing. People are slowly starting to understand that cow’s milk might not be the best for health, the environment and the animals.

Dairy products can be associated with some health problems. Milk is high in cholesterol and saturated fat, of which both have the possibility to increase the risk of cancer, such as prostate and breast cancer. Also, dairy products contain hormones, pesticides and puss.

At the same time consumers might be afraid that by cutting out dairy, they might be missing some important nutrients such as calcium and vitamin b2. Let’s have a look at these nutrients in cow’s milk vs. plant milk.

Nutrients

Vitamin D

Vitamin D is an essential nutrient, which is important for calcium balance, bone metabolism and the immune system.

Cow’s milk does contain vitamin D, but the amount is usually very small.

Plant milk only contains vitamin D, if it has been fortified. Generally, it is safer to rely on enough sunlight during summer days and vitamin D supplements in order to get an adequate amount of vitamin D. 

Calcium

As everyone knows, calcium is important for strong bones and teeth.

Calcium is generally lower in plant milks, but many companies fortify their plant milks with it.

Great plant sources of calcium are: kale, broccoli, pak choi, wild herbs, dried fruit, nuts, almonds, seeds and pseudo-grains (like amaranth) and some legumes (like tofu, soya beans, lupin, black beans, white beans, red beans).

Vitamin B2 (riboflavin)

Yes, cow’s milk does contain vitamin B2, but so do kale, mushrooms, asparagus, almonds, nutritional yeast, avocado and wild rice

In comparison: cow’s milk has 180µg per 100g, kale 182µg per 100g, mushrooms 389µg per 100g and broccoli 177µg per 100g.

Whole grains and legumes can also be a good source of vitamin B2.

Iron

Iron is known to be a critical nutrient in the vegan diet, but also for women in general. Iron is an important component of red blood cells, which carry oxygen from your lungs to your whole body.

I personally think it’s super cool that there is more iron in plant milk than there is in cow’s milk. In comparison there is about 60µg in 100g of cow’s milk while there can be around 570µg in 100g of soy milk.

Vitamin B12

Vitamin B12 is needed for brain function, nerve tissue health and the production of red blood cells.

Conventional plant milks are sometimes fortified with vitamin B12, though it is not the best source of vitamin B12. It is always recommended to supplement vitamin B12.

In addition to that, many people have a lactose intolerance, which can lead to diarrhoea, bloating and severe stomach cramps.

Environment

Many think that soy products are responsible for deforestation. Most soybeans, which are used for soy milk, usually come from France, Italy, Canada and West Europe.

98% of all soy that is being grown worldwide is used for animal food. Only 2% is being used for products, which we consume (most producers put the place of production on their packaging).

Soy beans that are used for animal food usually come from Argentina, Paraguay, Uruguay, Brazil and the US, where rainforests are being destroyed for this reason.

Two research groups from Sweden have analysed the life cycle of soy and oat milk vs. cow’s milk. 

This is what they have found out:

When it comes to land consumption, soy milk and oat milk use 39% and 21% respectively, compared to cow’s milk with 100%. Both plant milks also create less greenhouse gases (cow’s milk: 100%, soy milk: 24%, oat milk: 31%).

UNESCO-IHE analysed the water usage of soy milk and burgers as well as cow’s milk and beef burgers. The results are crazy! While it takes 158 litres of water to get a 150g soy burger, it takes 2350 litres (!!!!!) of water to get get a 150g beef burger. It takes 296 litres of water to get 1 litre of soy milk, while for 1 litre of cow’s milk, it takes 1050 litres of water. 

Animals

Not only does it seem that the consumption of plant milk has a lot of benefits for our health and the environment, but it seems like it has a lot of benefits for the animals, too.

A cow, just like any other mammal (including us humans) produces milk only when pregnant. A dairy cow needs to constantly produce milk. For this reason cows are being forcibly inseminated every year. After the cow gives birth to her baby, both, mother and calf are being separated within hours or minutes, which is very traumatic for both parts. The cow will be inseminated again, six to eight weeks after giving birth.

While female cows all face the same destiny and become a dairy cow, male calves are being sold to fattening farms, where they spend a few weeks gaining weight, until they are being sent to slaughter.

A life span of a cow is between 18 and 22 years. In the dairy and slaughter industry most of these animals die way before. A dairy cow, when no longer able to produce milk, will be slaughtered at the age of 4.5 to 6 years.

Nowadays there are so many choices and brands. More and more stores offer soy, oat, almond, cashew, hazelnut, coconut, rice, hemp and macadamia milk.

I personally love coconut and oat milk. Which is your favourite plant milk?

With love,

Jess x

Sources:
ProVeg (2018). Treatment of cows in the dairy industry.
Ecodemy (2019). Pflanzenmilch – der Siegeszug einer Milch, die eigentlich gar nicht so heißen darf
Categories
Vegan Nutrition

Is A Vegan Diet Healthy?

Is a vegan diet healthy?

Before becoming vegan myself, I remember thinking that all vegans ate were salads and vegetables. I had no clue. And I realised that today a lot of non-vegans still think the same way.

When I turned vegan in December 2017, I realised it was not at all the case. I actually couldn’t believe the amount of vegan options I could find everywhere, from vegan burgers, to pizzas, to doughnuts to ice cream. There was literally a vegan substitute for everything. I remember being so excited, that I started eating it all, regularly. I really felt like I wanted to try all of the different vegan options that existed on the market.

With time I started feeling really unwell in my body. Not only did I gain unhealthy weight, due to the amount of sugar and added fat I was eating, but I also felt really tired and without energy. I started questioning if the vegan diet was really for me. I couldn’t believe it. All of the vegans online were promoting all of the health benefits of a vegan diet and how amazing it has made them feel.

I realised that it doesn’t matter if you follow a vegan or omnivore diet. If your diet contains a lot of processed carbs, added sugar and unhealthy fat, you will be generally unhealthy and not feel great.

And so I turned it around. I wanted to become the healthiest I have every been. And I can proudly say my diet has never been healthier! The secret?

A whole food plant based diet!

This means that the focus of the diet is on unprocessed and real food.

What does this mean?

It is pretty simple! Just focus on covering these important food groups:

  • Fruits
  • Vegetables
  • Whole Grains (Brown rice, buckwheat, oatmeal, whole-wheat bread,…)
  • Legumes (Beans, Lentils, Chickpeas,…)
  • Healthy Fats, such as Nuts, Seeds and Avocados

As you can see, vegetables and fruits should make up the base of our diet, followed my unrefined whole grains, legumes and high-fat whole foods.

The moment I have focused on these 5 food groups and have started cooking it all from scratch, I saw significant changes to my body, mood and energy. I have never felt better!

And don’t understand me wrong, I still do like to eat mock-meats or vegan ice cream. I just make it an exception and don’t make it the staple of my diet anymore, as I used to.

To make things easier, I like to stock up on staples such as whole grains and legumes, and I also like to precook my meals or make sure I always have a big pot of rice, lentils, beans, in my fridge. So all I have to do is add in some vegetables and healthy fats and I am good to go.

Don’t overcomplicate it. It is really so much simpler than most of us might think!

 

With love,

Jess x

Categories
Vegan Nutrition

SUPERFOODS – Top 6 foods you should be eating every day!

Superfoods, a term that most of us are hearing a lot lately.

But what is a superfood?

A superfood is actually a marketing term. It is used to describe a food, which is considered to have special benefits for the health and well-being.

Once in a while it seems like the market has discovered a new superfood, which everyone hypes about and everyone wants to buy and consume. Most of the time these products are much more expensive, than conventional products.

If it is the açaí berry or maca powder, many of the normal foods we can find in our supermarket have the same or even better nutritional value. 

These are my personal 6 “superfoods” I eat (almost) every single day:

 

1) Sweet Potato

If you are scared of potatoes (how so many people are), you shouldn’t be!

Why I love sweet potatoes so much is that they are so versatile, are super tasteful naturally (no extra spices are needed) and they only have 87 calories per 100g.

Also, sweet potatoes are high in dietary fiber, which can help for weight loss.

 

2) Blueberries (vs. Açaí berries)

According to Dr. Michael Greger: “one cup of blueberries a day can improve cognition among older adults,[…].And the same thing with kids after just a single meal of blueberries.”

Blueberries are super rich in in vitamins, soluble fiber and phytochemicals.

Phytochemicals have an antioxidant effect. Antioxidants are chemical compounds produced by plants, which help protect our cells from free radicals. And as a result this may help prevent the development of certain types of cancer.

 

3) Kale

+other dark leafy greens such as swiss chard, collards, spinach and cabbages.

These foods are full of vitamin A, C and K, as well as fiber, calcium, folate, zinc, iron and magnesium.

Vitamins A and K (as well as D and E) are fat-soluble vitamins, which means they are better absorbed when a fat source, such as avocado, nuts, seeds, or oils are added to the meal.

 

4) Beans

Beans are the best source for low-fat protein. Legumes and beans are literally one of the healthiest food groups out there and we unfortunately don’t eat enough of it.

They are also loaded with fiber, antioxidants, phytonutrients and they are also packed with iron and zinc, which are minerals you’d expect to be in meat. But beans are so much better for you, as they are naturally low in saturated fat, sodium and they have no cholesterol.

Dr.Michael Greger suggest eating beans and legumes 2-3 times a day.

 

5) Quinoa

Especially, if you are active, quinoa should be a staple in your diet. I always have this grain at home, as it is high in fiber and it is also considered to be a high quality protein (contains more protein than any other grain).

It is also perfect for those of you who can not eat gluten, as this super-grain is gluten-free.

I like to have a combo of both, the white and the red quinoa at home.

 

6) Hemp Seeds

Why I love hemp seeds is not only because of the seed being a high protein source, but it is also a great source of Omega 3. It is essential for us. Especially vegans might not consume a sufficient amount of it while at the same over-consuming on Omega 6 (these fats are available more often in food than Omega 3).

It is important to eat at a ratio of 5:1, 5 being Omega 6 and 1 being Omega 3. The smaller the ratio the better.

 

What is your favourite?

 

With love,

Jess x