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Seeking Jess Vegan Nutrition Vegan Recipes Vegan Tips

Recipe: Quick Tofu & Broccoli (VEGAN)

This Quick Vegan Tofu & Broccoli Recipe is what you have been missing your whole life. Trust me 🙂

Honestly, I don’t think I have ever cooked something so quick with so little effort. And it just tasted bomb. Like seriously. I didn’t want the meal to end.

Portions: 2-3

This meal has 9.1g of protein and 60g of carbs. It’s also high in iron, calcium, vitamin A, vitamin C and folate.

Quick Vegan Tofu & Broccoli Recipe:

What you’ll need:

  • 1 cup of bulgur
  • 2 tsp oil (preferably sunflower)
  • 3 gloves of garlic
  • 1/2 red onion
  • 2 cups tofu
  • 3 cups broccoli
  • 1/2 cup soy sauce
  • vegetable broth
  • 2 tsp mustard
  • salt & pepper for taste
  • siracha for taste

Preparation:

  • cook up 1 cup of bulgur with 2 cups of water and add 1 tbs of vegetable broth
  • heat up some oil in a pot, add the garlic and onion and let cook for 2-3 minutes
  • mix up 1/2 cup of vegetable broth mixed with water, soy sauce and mustard
  • add tofu and broccoli to the pan and pour over with mixture
  • let cook for about 10-15 minutes on medium heat
  • add salt and pepper for taste
  • serve and add siracha for taste

If you would like to see the whole macro- & micronutrient count, make sure to check out cronometer.com.

Enjoy 🙂 

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Seeking Jess Vegan Nutrition Vegan Tips

10 Ways To Consume Less Sugar

Everyone loves the taste of something sweet, which in most cases is caused by added sugar.

First of all, let’s answer the question: What is sugar?

Sugar is a carbohydrate. Glucose is the most common carbohydrate and the most important and quickest source of energy.

Refined sugar in processed foods is the bad one as it has no vital substances or fiber. It has literally no use for the functions of our body. Overconsumption of sugar can be linked to several diseases such as obesity and type 2 diabetes.

I personally try to limit my consumption of sugar as much as I can, but I do like to indulge in sweets once in a while.

A few other things that have helped me reduce my sugar consumption are:

  1. Substitute sugar with dried fruit like dates, dried figs and raisins
  2. Spice things up with cinnamon, nutmeg, etc.
  3. Substitute overripe bananas (e.g. add to oatmeal or as sweetener in many recipes)
  4. Try to not consume anything sweet for 2 weeks, your taste buds will adapt very quickly and you will crave it less
  5. Use dark chocolate or cocoa powder
  6. Drink herbal teas with a lot of flavour (especially fruit)
  7. Make healthy vegan desserts out of raw ingredients
  8. Try to eat more nuts (fat content can reduce sugar craving)
  9. Try to eat more fruit and don’t be scared of the sugar in it (check blogpost)
  10. Swap out the soda for flavoured water (cold water with orange, lemon, cucumber, strawberry slices)

Lastly, I would say that you should always make sure to check food labels, as there is sugar in almost anything! Check out this blogpost for the different names sugar can have.

With love,

Jess x

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Vegan Nutrition

Is A Vegan Diet Healthy?

Is a vegan diet healthy?

Before becoming vegan myself, I remember thinking that all vegans ate were salads and vegetables. I had no clue. And I realised that today a lot of non-vegans still think the same way.

When I turned vegan in December 2017, I realised it was not at all the case. I actually couldn’t believe the amount of vegan options I could find everywhere, from vegan burgers, to pizzas, to doughnuts to ice cream. There was literally a vegan substitute for everything. I remember being so excited, that I started eating it all, regularly. I really felt like I wanted to try all of the different vegan options that existed on the market.

With time I started feeling really unwell in my body. Not only did I gain unhealthy weight, due to the amount of sugar and added fat I was eating, but I also felt really tired and without energy. I started questioning if the vegan diet was really for me. I couldn’t believe it. All of the vegans online were promoting all of the health benefits of a vegan diet and how amazing it has made them feel.

I realised that it doesn’t matter if you follow a vegan or omnivore diet. If your diet contains a lot of processed carbs, added sugar and unhealthy fat, you will be generally unhealthy and not feel great.

And so I turned it around. I wanted to become the healthiest I have every been. And I can proudly say my diet has never been healthier! The secret?

A whole food plant based diet!

This means that the focus of the diet is on unprocessed and real food.

What does this mean?

It is pretty simple! Just focus on covering these important food groups:

  • Fruits
  • Vegetables
  • Whole Grains (Brown rice, buckwheat, oatmeal, whole-wheat bread,…)
  • Legumes (Beans, Lentils, Chickpeas,…)
  • Healthy Fats, such as Nuts, Seeds and Avocados

As you can see, vegetables and fruits should make up the base of our diet, followed my unrefined whole grains, legumes and high-fat whole foods.

The moment I have focused on these 5 food groups and have started cooking it all from scratch, I saw significant changes to my body, mood and energy. I have never felt better!

And don’t understand me wrong, I still do like to eat mock-meats or vegan ice cream. I just make it an exception and don’t make it the staple of my diet anymore, as I used to.

To make things easier, I like to stock up on staples such as whole grains and legumes, and I also like to precook my meals or make sure I always have a big pot of rice, lentils, beans, in my fridge. So all I have to do is add in some vegetables and healthy fats and I am good to go.

Don’t overcomplicate it. It is really so much simpler than most of us might think!

 

With love,

Jess x

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Vegan Nutrition Vegan Tips

Vegan Nutrition Advice And Top 3 Vegan Recipes By Lissette From “stayhealthyforyou”

Vegan Nutrition Advice

You should be able to get most of the nutrients you need from eating a varied and balanced vegan diet.

Lissette’s advice for a healthy vegan diet:

  • Eat at least 5 portions of a variety of fruit and vegetables in every meal, potatoes, bread, rice, pasta or other starchy carbohydrates (choose wholegrain where possible)
  • Have some dairy alternatives, such as soya drinks and yoghurts (choose lower fat and lower sugar options) eat some beans, and a lot of water of course.
  • Eat all the variety of legumes, lentils, beans, chickpeas are a great source of protein and carbohydrates, just make sure to combine them with a cereal to complete all the amino acids,  grains and legumes, or nuts and seeds plus legumes, this could be throughout the day, not in every meal.
  • Of course plenty of water.

With good planning and an understanding of what makes up a healthy, balanced vegan diet, you can get all the nutrients your body needs, especially so you cannot miss out on essential nutrients, such as calcium, iron and vitamin B12.

 

Vegan sources of calcium and vitamin D

Calcium is needed for strong and healthy bones and teeth. Non-vegans get most of their calcium from dairy foods (milk, cheese and yoghurt), but vegans can get it from other foods.

Good sources of calcium for vegans include:

green, leafy vegetables – such as broccoli, cabbage, spinach, tofu sesame seeds and tahini, dried fruit, such as raisins, prunes, figs and dried apricots.

The body needs vitamin D to regulate the amount of calcium and phosphate in the body. These nutrients help keep bones, teeth and muscles healthy.

Good sources of vitamin D for vegans include:

exposure to sunlight, 15min daily is enough, fortified fat spreads, breakfast cereals and unsweetened soya drinks (with vitamin D added) or vitamin D supplements.

*Read the label to ensure the vitamin D used in a product is not of animal origin.

 

Vegan sources of iron

Iron is essential for the production of red blood cells.

A vegan diet can be high in iron, although iron from plant-based food is absorbed by the body less well than iron from meat.

Good sources of iron for vegans are:

pulses wholemeal bread and flour breakfast cereals fortified with iron dark green, leafy vegetables, such as watercress, broccoli and spring greens nuts dried fruits, such as apricots, prunes and figs, and always try to combine iron rich foods with vitamin c to help the iron absorption.

 

Vegan sources of vitamin B12

The body needs vitamin B12 to maintain healthy blood and a healthy nervous system.

Sources of vitamin B12 for vegans include:

breakfast cereals fortified with B12 unsweetened soya drinks fortified with vitamin B12 yeast extract, such as Marmite, which is fortified with vitamin B12

 

Vegan sources of omega-3 fatty acids 

Omega-3 fatty acids, primarily those found in oily fish, can help maintain a healthy heart and reduce the risk of heart disease when eaten as part of a healthy diet.

Sources of omega-3 fatty acids suitable for vegans include: 

flaxseed (linseed) oil rapeseed oil soya oil and soya-based foods, such as tofu and walnuts.

Evidence suggests that plant sources of omega-3 fatty acids may not have the same benefits in reducing the risk of heart disease as those in oily fish.

 

Lissette’s Top 3 Vegan Recipes:

1) Vegan falafel salad with a garlic dill dressing 

For the falafel mixture you’ll need:

  • 400g of cooked and dry chickpeas,
  • 15g of chopped parsley or cilantro if you want,
  • 2 medium shallots minced,
  • 15g of raw sesame seeds,
  • 1/2 tsp cumin,
  • 20-30g all purpose flour,
  • salt and pepper for taste.

Method:

Process the chickpeas, parsley, shallot, garlic, sesame seeds, cumin, salt, pepper, You’re looking for a crumbly dough, not a paste, then add the flour 1spoon at a time and mix until you get a mixture that doesn’t stick to your hands, let it rest 30min in the fridge for a ticker texture, or just roll them and cook them for about 5min each side or bake them until golden and that’s it!

For the dressing I just processed 1/4 cup of tahini, 1/2 medium lemon, 1 tsp dried dill and 2 cloves garlic, minced.

 

2) Brown rice and broccoli with teriyaki tofu

A nutritious and easy meal, I made the teriyaki sauce with

  • 1tbsp of Tamari,
  • 1 tsp sesame oil,
  • 1 tsp stevia powder,
  • 1/2 tsp grated fresh ginger,
  • salt and pepper to taste,

then just stir fry the tofu until brown and voilà it’s done!, you can combine it with rice and veggies or in a sandwich with tomatoes and greens etc.

 

3) Vegan chickpea burger

I would say this one and the black bean patty are my two favourite vegan burgers.

For the chickpea patty you’ll need:

  • 2 cups of cooked chickpeas then mashed,
  • 1 grated carrot,
  • 1/2 minced onion,
  • 1/2 tsp of garlic powder,
  • salt and pepper to taste.

Mix all the ingredients, Form your mixture into patties and lightly pan-fry for 3 to 4 minutes on each side until golden brown. And that’s it!

 

I hope this information is useful and you like my recipes, for more check out @stayhealthyforyou, any contact or nutrition consult, send me an email, don’t hesitate to ask me anything! I’m here for that.

Lissette xx

Categories
Vegan Nutrition

SUPERFOODS – Top 6 foods you should be eating every day!

Superfoods, a term that most of us are hearing a lot lately.

But what is a superfood?

A superfood is actually a marketing term. It is used to describe a food, which is considered to have special benefits for the health and well-being.

Once in a while it seems like the market has discovered a new superfood, which everyone hypes about and everyone wants to buy and consume. Most of the time these products are much more expensive, than conventional products.

If it is the açaí berry or maca powder, many of the normal foods we can find in our supermarket have the same or even better nutritional value. 

These are my personal 6 “superfoods” I eat (almost) every single day:

 

1) Sweet Potato

If you are scared of potatoes (how so many people are), you shouldn’t be!

Why I love sweet potatoes so much is that they are so versatile, are super tasteful naturally (no extra spices are needed) and they only have 87 calories per 100g.

Also, sweet potatoes are high in dietary fiber, which can help for weight loss.

 

2) Blueberries (vs. Açaí berries)

According to Dr. Michael Greger: “one cup of blueberries a day can improve cognition among older adults,[…].And the same thing with kids after just a single meal of blueberries.”

Blueberries are super rich in in vitamins, soluble fiber and phytochemicals.

Phytochemicals have an antioxidant effect. Antioxidants are chemical compounds produced by plants, which help protect our cells from free radicals. And as a result this may help prevent the development of certain types of cancer.

 

3) Kale

+other dark leafy greens such as swiss chard, collards, spinach and cabbages.

These foods are full of vitamin A, C and K, as well as fiber, calcium, folate, zinc, iron and magnesium.

Vitamins A and K (as well as D and E) are fat-soluble vitamins, which means they are better absorbed when a fat source, such as avocado, nuts, seeds, or oils are added to the meal.

 

4) Beans

Beans are the best source for low-fat protein. Legumes and beans are literally one of the healthiest food groups out there and we unfortunately don’t eat enough of it.

They are also loaded with fiber, antioxidants, phytonutrients and they are also packed with iron and zinc, which are minerals you’d expect to be in meat. But beans are so much better for you, as they are naturally low in saturated fat, sodium and they have no cholesterol.

Dr.Michael Greger suggest eating beans and legumes 2-3 times a day.

 

5) Quinoa

Especially, if you are active, quinoa should be a staple in your diet. I always have this grain at home, as it is high in fiber and it is also considered to be a high quality protein (contains more protein than any other grain).

It is also perfect for those of you who can not eat gluten, as this super-grain is gluten-free.

I like to have a combo of both, the white and the red quinoa at home.

 

6) Hemp Seeds

Why I love hemp seeds is not only because of the seed being a high protein source, but it is also a great source of Omega 3. It is essential for us. Especially vegans might not consume a sufficient amount of it while at the same over-consuming on Omega 6 (these fats are available more often in food than Omega 3).

It is important to eat at a ratio of 5:1, 5 being Omega 6 and 1 being Omega 3. The smaller the ratio the better.

 

What is your favourite?

 

With love,

Jess x